March 22, 2019

26th Space Coast Open Chess Festival - Flyer

👉Here👈 is a PDF flyer for the 26th Space Coast Open Chess Festival

See 👀 also the 👉events page👈 for latest information, including schedule of side events and registration links

SCCF Awarded Silver Seal of Transparency, rated in top 2% of non-profits for transparency by GuideStar

UPDATE March 22, 2019-SCCF has now received the 2019 Silver Seal of Transparency from GuideStar, our second consecutive year.

ORIGINAL POST Jan. 12, 2019-The Space Coast Chess Foundation (SCCF) has received the 2018 Silver Seal of Transparency from GuideStar, a leading provider of information about non-profits. This rating places the Space Coast Chess Foundation in the top 2% of all non-profits based on transparency. Click on the logo below for more information.

September 1, 2018

Tournament Report: Fighting Chess at the 25th Space Coast Open - Table of Contents

25th Space Coast Open Tournament Report, April 27-28, 2018 


Table of Contents 


Fighting Chess on the Beach for the 25th Anniversary Edition of the Space Coast Open Chess Festival 


Games from the 25th Space Coast Open, April 27-29, 2018


Final Standings - Cross Tables:

     Master Section

     Class A

     Class B

     Class C

     Class D

     Class E/Under 1200

     Blitz 


25th Space Coast Open Event Details (pre-event flyer)

Fighting Chess on the Beach for the 25th Anniversary Edition of the Space Coast Open Chess Festival

April 27-29, 2018
By Peter Dyson, Chairman, Space Coast Open Organizing Committee

Chess on the Beach. The first Space Coast Open (SCO) was held in October 1991 at a hotel about 15 miles south of this year’s Cocoa Beach location, and, you guessed it, on the beach! As the tournament dates bounced from Spring to Fall, searching for its optimal home on the chess calendar, and moved among a variety of venues (all but two oceanfront), some years were missed. Thus, it took a couple of extra years to reach the 25th anniversary and get recognized as a USCF Heritage event. In celebration of this special milestone we boosted the prize fund to a new record of $20,000, ten times bigger than at our inaugural event. We also increased the Brilliancy prize levels and added Senior prizes. As our weekend kicked off we welcomed a record attendance of 222 players.

Sofia comes to Cocoa Beach. (The rules, not the Polgar sister!) One thing that can frustrate both organizers and fans is the sometimes overly cautious nature of top players when there is prize money at stake. This was painfully evident at the 2017 tournament, when several top matchups were drawn in less than a dozen moves. Since we only broadcast a few of the top boards, this made for rather disappointing viewing. To encourage more fighting chess in the top section, for the 25th SCO we adopted a variant of the Sofia rules, not allowing draw offers prior to move 30. This produced the desired result, as the players delivered fighting games. The Sofia rule may have been a key factor in having an outright winner emerge at the end of the last round. I’ll get back to that in a moment.

Big Guns in the Master Section. The Master section was packed with strong players, including 4 Grandmasters, 2 International Masters, 4 FIDE masters, and another dozen USCF masters and senior masters. A couple of months before the event, I was contacted by Alexander Hart on behalf of no less a player than the Russian GM Alexey Dreev (2750), who has been among the top players in the world for more than 2 decades. “Would [we] be interested in arranging to have him do a simul?” Yes, of course! Ultimately, the extra demands of contesting a simul during a short tournament led GM Dreev to decide to focus on the tournament and forego the simul. So, the smart money would be on GM Dreev as the pre-tournament favorite.

Going into the last round the form charts were holding, as the four GMs were tied for first place with 3 ½ points each. GM Dreev had drawn in round 4 versus #2 seed Ruifeng Li (2692) while GMs Fidel Corrales Jimenez (2618) and Hedinn Steingrimsson (2646) of Iceland were paired in round 3, and that game also ended in a draw. The latter two players then won in round 4 vs. former SCO champ Fabio La Rota and local star John Ludwig, respectively, to catch Dreev and Li. So now the pairings were flipped with Dreev playing the White pieces vs. Steingrimsson and Corrales playing White vs. Li. The Corrales – Li game was the first of the two to finish. Another draw, but only after a serious battle where Li slowly built an advantage. There were some brief fireworks, leading to a Rook and opposite colored Bishop endgame that was favorable for Li. However, Li had the opportunity to force a draw by repetition, and he decided not to test Corrales’ defensive skills. Meanwhile, the battle on board one continued, with Dreev falling into a passive position. Steingrimsson kept up the pressure and ultimately converted to score the full point, emerging as the undisputed winner of the 25th SCO. Yes, thanks in part to Sofia insuring against a short “GM draw.” Both last round GM match-ups are presented in the games section with light analysis.
GM Dreev - GM Steingrimsson - Rd 5 board 1 [Photo: Koretsky]

GM Fidel Corrales - GM Ruifeng Li - Rd 5 [Photo: Koretsky]
First place  GM Hedinn Steingrimsson shows off his Chrystal tear-drop trophy [Photo: Dyson]
In reviewing the win by Steingrimsson, our games judge, IM Javad Maharramzade had this to say, “A very clean game by the tournament's eventual champion. To take down a player of Dreev’s caliber with Black in the last round without committing any inaccuracies is certainly not an ordinary accomplishment. Dreev was not at his best in this game, not achieving anything in the opening and allowing a typical position with an isolated pawn in the center. Quickly Black was able to shatter White's pawn structure on the king-side, and Dreev's two bishops did not prove to be a sufficient compensation for that. A critical improvement to the Black's position was 34... Nh5!, freeing the other Knight from the necessity to support the Bishop on f4. White's position collapsed soon afterwards.”

After the tournament, Ruifeng Li offered another explanation for his draw and Dreev’s loss in the final round, saying, “The Masters section was remarkably strong. My best game was probably the penultimate round against Dreev, in which both of us got worn out.”

Entering the last round, only two players had 3 points and a chance to join the tie for second. But since they were paired, only a decisive result would allow one of them to advance. Vlad Yanovsky (2261) took the White side vs. Cuba’s IM Yunier Leyva Rivera (2492). This game was a real barn burner, starting with Black sacrificing an exchange on move 16 as his King came under heavy fire. Black defended multiple mate threats until White erred, missing key winning lines. Then came the counter-attack, and by time White returned the exchange on move 36, Black’s attack on the dark squares was irresistible, and the game ended a few moves later. Thus, IM Leyva Rivera moved up into a 3-way tie for second with Li and Corrales.

Other big winners in the Master section were FM Cesar Valido and NM Eric Cooke, who both won in the last round to score 3.5 points and share the lucrative Under 2400 prizes.  Dario Teodori and Ravindra Wijesundera tied on 3 points for the Under 2200 honors.
Former SCO Champ FM LaRota (left) vs. FM Valido [Photo: Koretsky]
NM Eric Cooke (right) keeps things well hidden in his board 1 match-up vs. GM Dreev [Photo: Essofi]

Dario Teodori-top U2200 is all smiles [Photo: Dyson]

Youth Dominate the Class Sections. In Class A, after 4 rounds, only Ben Silva had a perfect score, but he was held to a draw by top-seed Frank Castillo. This allowed the talented youngster Xavier Alvarez to catch Silva, with those two tying for first, and Alvarez claiming the trophy on tie-breaks, as well as winning the 3rd Brilliancy Prize.
Xavier Alvarez-1st Class A (tie-break) and 3rd Brilliancy Prize winner [Photo: Dyson]
Ruifeng Li was not the only member of the Li family to compete this year, and it was his 8-year old sister Rachael Li who took home the bigger prize check as she dominated the Class B section. She was the top seed in the section and led most of the field by a full point going into the last round, with only her final round opponent, Leon Cheng, a half point behind, and in striking distance of first place. The resulting draw put Li in first place with 4.5 points, while Cheng was joined by 3 other players won their last game to tie for 2nd place. After the tournament Rachael summed up her experience with great enthusiasm: “The beach was the best! I like all the games I won! I made lots of friends!”
With the tournament over and prizes won, it is time for fun-on-the-beach for Rachael and Ruifeng Li [Photo: Zhenjiang Li]

In Class C, no clear leader had emerged after 4 rounds of play, and the three players with 3.5 points had the best chance to win top honors. These were Nate Ziegler, Christopher Juarez, and James Zhang. None could score the full point, so they all ended on 4 points. This was good for a 3-way tie for first place, as no one else could catch them.
Kyle (U1200-4th-tie) and Nate Ziegler  (Class C co-champ) [Photo: Dyson]
Action in the Class Sections [Photo: Koretsky]
The University of Central Florida (UCF) Chess Club sent several very eager players. While their top player, NM Nick Moore faced the tough competition in the master section and finished just out of the money, the other club members were cleaning up in the lower sections. In Class C, Sammy Wohl only won “lunch money” in the big tie for 4th place, but in Class D, charismatic Karim Essofi ran away with the section, winning clear 1st place. He needed only a draw in the last round since his opponent, Andrew Tiansay, was the only player in a position to pass him with a win. Instead a quick draw was the result. In fact, it was so quick, the TD, Jon Haskel, sent out a search party to track them down and required them to play a new game (another draw). Only one of the players on 3 points, Matthew Cuza, was able to win in the last round to catch Tiansay and join a 2-way tie for 2nd place. Meanwhile, in the U1200 section, another UCF player, Tyler James Clark, got the job done by scoring the only perfect 5-0 in the event to assure his 1st place finish. Chasing Clark was Luke Wu, who took clear second place with 4.5 points, while Martin Sanchez took clear 3rd place with 4 points and also won the Top Senior Trophy.
Karim Essofi-1st Class D [Photo: Dyson]

Tyler James Clark-1st U1200 registers the only perfect 5-0 score and hams it up with his Chrystal trophy [Photo: Dyson]


UCF Chess Club Prize Winners [Photo: Kai Tabor]


Late Night Blitz. The Space Coast Open Blitz was held on Saturday night. Last year, Blitz specialist FM Corey Acor was edged out of first place by FM Yans Girones Barrios (not playing this year), by a half-point, but they did not face each other due to Acor’s early drawn match. This year, in the main tournament, Acor had withdrawn after two early losses. But he was dominant in the Blitz, starting with his first 3 matches (2 games each), where he won all 6 games to set up a showdown with the only other player sporting a perfect score going into the last round: top seed IM Yunier Leyva Rivera. Acor won with a convincing 2-0 score to take 1st place with a perfect score. This also allowed Pedro Hernandez and Raghav Venkat to catch Leyva Rivera by winning their final matches 2-0, and these 3 players tied for 2nd place. The last round also featured the “battle of the assistant TDs” as Diego Milla faced Steve Vigil, with Milla prevailing to claim the top under 2000 prize.

Grandmaster Simultaneous Exhibition. This year the weekend was even more packed than usual with side events. When GM Dreev opted not to give a simul, Ruifeng Li was quickly “volunteered” by his father, Zhenjiang Li, to step into the breach. Ruifeng is the #1 US player age 16, and #14 overall, so he is a huge talent. Some players, such as my friend and former Amateur Team teammate Mike Russell, came to the festival just for the opportunity to play Ruifeng. The simul was scheduled for Friday afternoon, and hence marked the official start of the weekend’s chess activities. Rachael was on hand to help out her big brother, but as only 13 players signed up for the simul, Ruifeng was up to the task of playing all comers without help, and won all the games.
GM Ruifeng Li gets the festival underway by winning all games vs. his simul challengers [Photo: Dyson]
 Grandmaster Game Analysis. Ruifeng did double duty supporting our side events. In addition to the simul, he conducted a game clinic after the tournament, spending several hours analyzing the games of anyone who wanted to learn what a top Grandmaster thought about their game. This was a new addition to our chess festival, provided at no cost to the players. The Li family was a pleasure to host at the SCO, and if we are lucky, we will see them back again.

Grandmaster Lectures. This year the festival packed in three Grandmaster lectures (counting the lecture by future-Grandmaster John Ludwig). The lectures are free to players and spectators alike. Currently a USCF Senior Master, John has been competing in the SCO since he was a Class B player. John kicked off the lecture series on Saturday morning. This was followed by a lecture by GM Fidel Corrales Jimenez. GM Corrales currently resides in St. Louis where his day job is in software development. He decided to bring his whole family to enjoy the Cocoa Beach area and to visit Sea World. For this, some extra expense money would come in handy! He asked about a second lecture spot, so sure enough, we squeezed in another lecture on Sunday between the 4th and 5th rounds.
SM John Ludwig lecture [Photo: Koretsky]

GM Fidel Corrales Jimenez lecture [Photo: Koretsky]

The Spirit of Wojo - Brilliancy Prizes. GM Alex Wojtkiewicz (affectionately called “Wojo”) played many times in the SCO and was usually part of our lecture series. After his untimely passing, we named our brilliancy prizes in his memory. This year we offered a total of $350 in prizes. IM Javad Maharramzade served as the Brilliancy Prize judge, his 13th consecutive year in this role. While some games are submitted in PGN or harvested from our broadcast, each year I give Javad a thick stack of scoresheets. He very diligently reviews all scoresheets the players turn in, whether marked for brilliancy consideration or not, just so as not to miss a hidden gem. This year two of the prizes went to games in the Master section. NM Carlos Andretta was awarded the 1st prize ($200) and Expert Andy Catlin was awarded second prize of $100. It was only in his search through the games from the class sections that Javad found the 3rd place prize winner ($50), awarded to Class A co-champion Xavier Alvarez, just edging out GM Steingrimsson’s win over GM Dreev, which garnered an honorable mention. See the games section for a selection of games with commentary and analysis.
Closing Remarks and Appreciation. Special thanks to the team that brings you the Space Coast Open. Jon Haskel served both as co-Organizer and Chief TD. As Andy Catlin put it, “It's always a pleasure to play in Jon's tournaments, even on my abbreviated schedule.” Jon was assisted by Chief Assistant TD, Steve Vigil, and Assistant TD Diego Milla. With our long-time book vendor Steve Cernobyl now semi-retired, the reins were ably taken up by our new book and equipment vendor, Orlando Chess & Games, run by Alex Zelner with the assistance of Andrew Slade. The bookstore also hosted T-shirt vendor Wit-T-Shirts.
Chief TD Jon Haskel on-the-job [Photo: Koretsky]

The President of the Space Coast Chess Foundation (SCCF) is Dr. Peter Koretsky. He serves as co-Organizer and the head of sponsor relations, coordinating the fund-raising efforts that support our favorable entry-fee-to-prize ratio, the many side events, and our local scholastics activities. Dr. Koretsky also served as master of ceremonies for GM Li’s simul.
Space Coast Chess Foundation President Peter Koretsky "testing" GM Li in the simul [Photo: Dyson]
Much appreciated behind-the-scenes assistance was also provided by SCCF board member Scott Langford and by Brenna Koretsky and Linda Wicker. The husband-and-wife team of Langford and Wicker were responsible for securing the beautiful crystal trophies awarded to the section winners. Thank you to all.

Games from the 25th Space Coast Open, April 27-29, 2018

Here is our selection of games from the 25th Space Coast Open. Six games are presented. To see the available games, click on the down arrow (triangle) in the white box above the board window.

The first 3 games are the Brilliancy Prize winners, selected by Brilliancy Prize Judge IM Javad Maharramzade.

First Prize: $200 to Carlos Andretta
Second Prize: $100 to Andy Catlin. Due to work commitments, Andy Catlin was only able to play 2 rounds, scoring 1.5 points against a high expert (win) and a strong master (draw). Along with two half-point byes, this resulted in a score of 2.5, which would have been good for a tie for the third expert prize if Andy had wanted to request a zero point bye in the last round, rather then withdrawing. But his play did not go unnoticed by our dedicated Brilliancy Prize judge, IM Javad Maharramzade, who selected this game for the second Brilliancy Prize.
Third Prize: $50 to Xavier Alvarez

Next we have the decisive game by the tournament winner, Icelandic GM Hedinn Steingrimsson. With the Black pieces he convincingly topples top ranked GM Alexey Dreev to take sole possession of first place. The game receives an honorable mention for the Brilliancy Prize. IM Maharramzade said, "A very clean game by the tournament's eventual champion. To take down a player of Dreev's caliber with Black in the last round without committing any inaccuracies is certainly not an ordinary accomplishment. Dreev was not at his best in this game, not achieving anything in the opening and allowing a typical position with an isolated pawn in the center. Quickly Black was able to shatter White's pawn structure on the king-side, and Dreev's two bishops did not prove to be a sufficient compensation for that. A critical improvement to the Black's position was 34... Nh5!, freeing the other Knight from the necessity to support the Bishop on f4. White's position collapsed soon afterwards."

Then we have a fighting draw between two of the Grandmasters who tied for second place. This game was also played in the last round, and a win by either player would have given them a share of first place and a much larger prize. This was not meant to be, and after some fireworks, the game was drawn while the key matchup on board 1 was still underway.

And for our final game we have a wild attacking game where Vlad Yanovsky was on the verge of defeating IM Yunier Leyva Rivera, but in the end, the IM triumphed, enabling him to join a 3-way tie for second place.









Games

[Event "25th Space Coast Open"]
[Site "Cocoa Beach, Florida"]
[Date "2018.04.29"]
[Round "5"]
[White "Andretta, Carlos"]
[Black "Venkat, Raghav"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "A00"]
[WhiteElo "2214"]
[BlackElo "2161"]
[Annotator "Dyson,Peter"]
[PlyCount "111"]
[EventDate "2018.04.27"]
[EventCountry "USA"]

{[%evp 19,111,28,28,5,20,21,39,3,28,25,63,63,79,79,80,33,33,12,25,23,42,45,77,
77,76,54,92,92,129,121,125,113,139,138,144,134,133,135,134,136,136,136,134,133,
137,134,187,192,187,168,387,131,328,233,223,117,123,117,155,155,212,209,180,
179,259,248,248,254,391,393,394,390,368,430,387,292,340,340,2013,2115,2115,
2161,1918,2187,2071,2771,1741,2775,2776,2054,2771,2776,2776,2776]} {Winner of
1st Brilliancy Prize at the 25th Space Coast Open. "Study this game thoroughly
if you want to learn how to play against Botvinnik triangle structures. A
clean example all the way from the opening to the endgame. One could argue
that White could have finished the job quicker had he kept the opposite color
bishops (37.Bg6 instead of 37.Be6), but the ensuing Rook endgame with the
White King marching to take the Black's pawn on b6 is another nice
instructional piece in itself, so it doesn't diminish the game's overall value.
" IM Javad Maharramzade, Brilliancy Prize Judge. Annotated with ChessBase
Tactical Analysis running Stockfish 7 64.} 1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. g3 Bg7 4. Bg2
O-O 5. O-O c5 6. Nc3 Nc6 7. d3 d6 8. Rb1 e5 9. Bg5 h6 10. Bxf6 Bxf6 11. Ne1 {
A38: Symmetrical English vs ...g6: 4 Bg2 Bg7 5 Nf3 Nf6} Be6 12. Nc2 Rb8 $146 ({
Predecessor:} 12... Qd7 13. b4 Rad8 14. b5 Ne7 {1/2-1/2 (43) Nanu,C (2526)
-Petrisor,A (2386) Sarata Monteoru 2011}) 13. a3 {White is slightly better.}
Nd4 14. b4 Nxc2 15. Qxc2 b6 16. Qa4 Qd7 17. Qxd7 (17. Bc6 {is interesting.} Qe7
18. Nd5 Bxd5 19. Bxd5 Kg7 20. Kg2) 17... Bxd7 18. Rb3 Rfd8 19. b5 Be6 20. a4
Rd7 21. Bc6 Rc7 22. Bd5 Kf8 {[#]} 23. a5 $1 {[%mdl 512]} Ke7 (23... bxa5 24.
Ra3) 24. axb6 axb6 25. Ra1 Kd7 26. Rba3 Bd8 27. Ra8 Rxa8 28. Rxa8 Rc8 29. Bc6+
Ke7 30. Nd5+ Kf8 31. Ra7 Bxd5 32. Bxd5 $16 {[%mdl 4096] Endgame KRB-KRB} Rc7
33. Ra8 Ke8 34. Kg2 f5 $2 {[#]} (34... h5 35. Kf3 g5 36. Bc6+ Ke7) 35. Kf3 $2 (
35. Bc6+ $1 $18 Ke7 36. e3) 35... Kd7 $2 (35... Rg7 $16 36. h3 h5) 36. Bf7 g5
37. Be6+ ({White should play} 37. h3 $18) 37... Kxe6 38. Rxd8 {KR-KR} Ra7 39.
Rh8 Ra2 (39... g4+ $16 40. Ke3 Rf7) 40. Rxh6+ $18 Ke7 41. h3 e4+ (41... Ra3
$142 42. Rg6 e4+ 43. Ke3 d5 44. cxd5 (44. Rxb6 dxc4 45. g4 cxd3 $14) 44... c4
45. Rxg5 (45. Rxb6 exd3 46. Re6+ Kd7 $18) 45... Kf6) 42. dxe4 fxe4+ 43. Kxe4
Rxe2+ (43... Kd7 $142 44. Kf5 Rxe2 45. Rh7+ Kd8) 44. Kd5 Rxf2 45. Kc6 Rc2 46.
Kxb6 Rxc4 47. Kc6 Rb4 48. Rxd6 {Black must now prevent Rd5.} Rxb5 $2 (48... g4
49. hxg4 Rxg4) 49. Rd7+ $1 {White is clearly winning.} ({Inferior is} 49. Kxb5
Kxd6 50. Kc4 Kc6 $11) 49... Ke6 50. Kxb5 Kxd7 51. Kxc5 {KPP-KP} Ke6 52. Kd4 Kf5
53. Kd5 Kf6 54. g4 Kf7 55. Ke5 Kg6 56. Ke6 {Accuracy: White = 62%, Black = 21%.
} 1-0

[Event "Space Coast Open"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2018.04.28"]
[Round "2"]
[White "Catlin, Andy"]
[Black "Wijesundera, Ravindra"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B22"]
[WhiteElo "2015"]
[BlackElo "2173"]
[Annotator "Andy Catlin, Stockfish, Javad Maharramzade"]
[PlyCount "55"]
[EventDate "2016.02.11"]

{Annotators: Andy Catlin (AC), IM Javad Maharramzade (JM) - brilliancy prize
judge, Stockfish (SF). Awarded 2nd Brilliancy prize. "A well-executed Bishop
sacrifice on h7 to expose the Black King, demonstrating the benefit of
delaying the castling, giving the H-Rook an opportunity to join the attack
quickly. This idea seems to get more and more popular in modern theory in many
different openings, where you see the h-pawn getting pushed to h4 very early
in the game. Black was forced to return the piece quickly, and White's finish
was energetic and efficient." (JM).} 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. c3 Nf6 4. e5 Nd5 5.
d4 cxd4 6. cxd4 e6 (6... d6 {is more active. (AC)}) 7. Nc3 Nxc3 $6 (7... d6
$142 {(SF)}) 8. bxc3 d5 9. Bd3 {We've transposed into a French pawn structure,
where Black has a fairly passive setup. (AC)} Be7 10. Rb1 O-O $6 (10... b6 {
seems much more prudent. (AC)}) 11. h4 $1 f5 12. exf6 Bxf6 (12... Rxf6 {
is a better try (AC)}) (12... gxf6 {Looked like an interesting try, too. (AC)}
13. Ng5 $5 {!! (SF) continues the line} Qe8 14. Nxh7 Rf7 (14... Qf7 15. Qg4+
Qg7 16. Qh5 f5 17. Nxf8 $18) 15. Qh5 Bd7 16. Bg6 $18) 13. Bxh7+ Kxh7 14. Ng5+
Kg8 15. Qh5 Bxg5 16. hxg5 Ne7 17. g6 Nxg6 18. Qxg6 e5 (18... Qf6 19. Qh7+ Kf7
20. Rh3 $1 $18 {(AC)}) 19. Qh7+ Kf7 20. Rh6 Qc7 21. Qg6+ {repeating in the
hope that Black would want to put his king someplace worse (AC)} Kg8 22. Qh7+
Kf7 23. Bg5 exd4 $4 (23... Ke8 $1 {(AC) is most tenacious. I don't know if I
would have found} 24. Rxb7 $3 Qxb7 ({or} 24... Bxb7 25. Re6+ Kf7 26. Rf6+ Ke8
27. Qh5+ {like in the game} Kd7 28. Qg4+ Ke8 29. Qe6+ Qe7 30. Rxf8+) 25. Qg6+
Qf7 26. Qc6+ Qd7 27. Re6+ Kf7 28. Re7+) 24. Rf6+ Ke8 25. Qh5+ Kd7 (25... Ke7
26. Rf7+ {(AC) With mate in 3 (SF)}) 26. Rxf8 Qe5+ 27. Kf1 b6 28. Qg4+ 1-0

[Event "25th Space Coast Open"]
[Site "Cocoa Beach, Florida"]
[Date "2018.04.29"]
[Round "4"]
[White "Alvarez, Xavier"]
[Black "Machado, Lester"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B19"]
[WhiteElo "1973"]
[BlackElo "1991"]
[Annotator "Dyson,Peter and Maharramzade, Javad"]
[PlyCount "61"]
[EventDate "2018.04.29"]
[EventCountry "USA"]

{[%evp 27,61,5,17,-5,-5,-145,57,-8,72,63,75,76,78,82,94,65,66,65,70,66,66,66,
66,66,66,69,96,40,106,93,67,67,793,847,29980,29980]} {Winner of 3rd Brilliancy
Prize at the 25th Space Coast Open. "This is to pay tribute to the fighters of
the lower sections. In a well-known line in classical Caro-Kann White employed
an unusual move order (13.Kb1, 14.Nf1, 15.Qe2 - this aggressive plan is
typically executed without spending a tempo on Kb1), but confused his opponent
enough to get a very promising attacking position by move 18. Black could have
defended better, but White was very determined in the ensuing attack and
delivered a very nice finishing shot - 30.Qg6! Black resigned a bit
prematurely, not allowing White to show the full combination: 31...Qc3 32.h6!
fg6 33.hg7 Mate." IM Javad Maharramzade (JM), Brilliancy Prize Judge.
Annotated with ChessBase Tactical Analysis running Stockfish 7 64.} 1. e4 c6 2.
d4 d5 3. Nc3 dxe4 4. Nxe4 Bf5 5. Ng3 Bg6 6. h4 {[%cal Bh2h4,Bh4h5][%mdl 32]} h6
7. h5 Bh7 8. Nf3 Nd7 9. Bd3 Bxd3 10. Qxd3 e6 11. Bd2 Ngf6 12. O-O-O Be7 13. Kb1
O-O 14. Nf1 {B19: Classical Caro-Kann: 4...Bf5 main line} (14. Ne4 c5 15. g4
Nxg4 16. Qe2 Qb6 17. Ne5 Ndxe5 18. dxe5 f5 19. exf6 Nxf6 20. Nc3 Rad8 21. Rhg1
Kh8 22. Rg6 {1/2-1/2 (38) Saric,I (2662)-Nisipeanu,L (2672) Heraklio 2017})
14... c5 {LiveBook: 3 Games} 15. Qe2 Qb6 16. g4 (16. c3 $11) 16... Nh7 $146 ({
Much worse is} 16... Nxg4 $6 17. Rg1 $11) (16... cxd4 $142 $17 {...Nd5 is the
strong threat.} 17. g5 hxg5) ({Predecessor:} 16... cxd4 17. g5 hxg5 18. Bxg5
Nd5 19. Ka1 Bxg5 20. Nxg5 Rac8 21. Qd3 N7f6 22. a3 {Here Black has a
significant advantage. ½-½ (56) Grover,S (2432)-Peelen,P (2363) Wijk aan Zee
2010}) 17. Ne5 Nxe5 $2 (17... Rfd8 $11 {keeps the balance.}) 18. dxe5 $16 Qc6
19. Ng3 Rfd8 20. f4 Rd7 21. Rdg1 Rad8 22. Bc1 c4 23. g5 (23. Ne4 $142 $16)
23... hxg5 24. fxg5 Bxg5 25. Ne4 Bxc1 26. Kxc1 {Threatens to win with Qg4.} Kh8
27. Qg4 Rg8 {[#]} (27... f5 $14 28. exf6 Nxf6 29. Nxf6 gxf6) 28. Nf6 $1 $40 {
[%mdl 640] Black is in trouble.} Nxf6 $8 (28... gxf6 29. Qxg8#) 29. exf6 {
Intending Qg6! and mate.} c3 $4 {[%mdl 8192] Overlooking White's threat. [#]} (
29... Qd5 $14) 30. Qg6 $3 $18 {[%cal Rf6g7][%mdl 512]} cxb2+ (30... fxg6 31.
hxg6+ Qxh1 32. Rxh1#) 31. Kb1 {[%mdl 32768] Accuracy: White = 42%, Black = 34%.
. Sensor Board Error (Ke4/e5)?} (31. Kb1 Qc3 32. h6 fxg6 33. hxg7# {(JM)}) 1-0

[Event "25th Space Coast Open"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2018.04.29"]
[Round "5.1"]
[White "Dreev, Aleksey"]
[Black "Steingrimsson, Hedinn"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "D47"]
[WhiteElo "2653"]
[BlackElo "2574"]
[PlyCount "104"]
[EventDate "2018.??.??"]
[TimeControl "5400+30"]
[WhiteClock "0:09:57"]
[BlackClock "0:01:12"]

{[%evp 25,104,-25,-29,-31,-37,-37,-37,-66,-67,-73,-49,-66,-48,-64,-48,-70,-66,
-87,-75,-85,-85,-83,-82,-85,-85,-89,-85,-90,-56,-100,-76,-90,-75,-102,-97,-114,
-116,-116,-106,-117,-113,-117,-116,-120,-116,-117,-116,-270,-268,-268,-277,
-277,-276,-378,-381,-375,-371,-388,-386,-464,-462,-509,-509,-517,-529,-525,
-517,-504,-504,-502,-496,-514,-512,-621,-621,-601,-586,-668,-622,-845,-884]} 1.
d4 {[%emt 0:00:00]} d5 {[%emt 0:06:29]} 2. c4 {[%emt 0:00:00]} e6 {[%emt 0:00:
01]} 3. Nc3 {[%emt 0:00:33]} c6 {[%emt 0:00:03]} 4. e3 {[%emt 0:00:27]} Nf6 {
[%emt 0:00:45]} 5. Bd3 {[%emt 0:01:46]} Nbd7 {[%emt 0:04:00]} 6. Nf3 {[%emt 0:
11:44]} dxc4 {[%emt 0:02:34]} 7. Bxc4 {[%emt 0:00:09]} b5 {[%emt 0:00:02]} 8.
Bd3 {[%emt 0:01:09]} Bd6 {[%emt 0:05:44]} 9. O-O {[%emt 0:01:44]} O-O {[%emt 0:
00:19]} 10. a3 {[%emt 0:06:19]} Bb7 {[%emt 0:02:52]} 11. Bd2 {[%emt 0:02:46]
D47: Semi-Slav: Meran System} a5 {[%emt 0:01:23][%cal Ba7a5,Ba5b4][%mdl 32]}
12. Rc1 {[%emt 0:05:04]} b4 {[%emt 0:07:54]} 13. axb4 {[%emt 0:15:01]} axb4 {
[%emt 0:00:02] LiveBook: 3 Games} 14. Na4 $146 {[%emt 0:02:05]} ({Predecessor:
} 14. Ne4 Nxe4 15. Bxe4 Qb6 16. Re1 Rfd8 17. Qb3 c5 18. Bxb7 {1/2-1/2 (18)
Georgiev,K (2645)-Shirov,A (2726) Kallithea 2008}) 14... Qa5 {[%emt 0:05:01]}
15. b3 {[%emt 0:04:58]} c5 {[%emt 0:01:45]} 16. Nb2 {[%emt 0:07:32]} cxd4 {
[%emt 0:04:24] Hoping for ...Qh5.} 17. exd4 {[%emt 0:13:41]} Qh5 {[%emt 0:04:
47]} 18. h3 $1 {[%emt 0:00:02]} Bxf3 {[%emt 0:02:18]} 19. Qxf3 {[%emt 0:00:02]}
Qxf3 {[%emt 0:00:05]} 20. gxf3 {[%emt 0:00:03]} Nd5 {[%emt 0:01:01]} 21. Be4 {
[%emt 0:00:21]} Ra2 {[%emt 0:04:37]} 22. Nc4 {[%emt 0:02:26]} Bf4 {[%emt 0:00:
07]} 23. Be3 {[%emt 0:00:47] Threatening Bxd5.} N7f6 {[%emt 0:00:25]} 24. Bb1 {
[%emt 0:08:39]} Ra7 {[%emt 0:09:25]} 25. Rfe1 {[%emt 0:00:16]} Rc8 {[%emt 0:04:
03]} 26. Bd3 {[%emt 0:02:35]} g5 {[%emt 0:00:58]} 27. Bf1 {[%emt 0:04:53]} Ra2
{[%emt 0:05:28]} 28. Bd3 {[%emt 0:00:05]} Kg7 {[%emt 0:00:39]} 29. Kf1 {
[%emt 0:01:04]} h5 {[%emt 0:02:38][%cal Bh7h5,Bh5h4][%mdl 32]} 30. Ra1 {
[%emt 0:03:56]} Rca8 {[%emt 0:00:55]} 31. Rxa2 {[%emt 0:00:06]} Rxa2 {[%emt 0:
00:02]} 32. Bb1 {[%emt 0:00:05]} Ra7 {[%emt 0:00:52]} 33. Bd3 {[%emt 0:01:03]}
h4 {[%emt 0:00:31]} 34. Bb1 {[%emt 0:00:31]} Nh5 {[%emt 0:01:07]} 35. Be4 {
[%emt 0:01:26]} Nc3 {[%emt 0:02:05]} 36. d5 $2 {[%emt 0:03:47]} (36. Kg1 $17)
36... Bxe3 $19 {[%emt 0:01:03]} 37. Nxe3 {[%emt 0:00:01]} f5 {[%emt 0:10:18]}
38. Bd3 {[%emt 0:01:17]} Nxd5 {[%emt 0:00:07]} 39. Nxd5 {[%emt 0:00:20]} exd5 {
[%emt 0:00:01]} 40. Bxf5 {[%emt 0:00:44][%mdl 4096] Endgame KRB-KRN} Nf4 {
[%emt 0:00:16]} 41. Rc1 {[%emt 0:00:30]} Kf6 {[%emt 0:00:50]} 42. Bc8 {[%emt 0:
00:14]} Ra2 {[%emt 0:00:58] Black is clearly winning.} 43. Rc6+ {[%emt 0:00:41]
} Ke5 {[%emt 0:00:09] [#] ( -> ...Ra1+)} 44. Ke1 {[%emt 0:00:01]} Nd3+ {
[%emt 0:00:29]} 45. Kd1 {[%emt 0:00:00]} Nxf2+ {[%emt 0:00:13]} 46. Kc1 {
[%emt 0:00:01]} Nd3+ {[%emt 0:00:11]} 47. Kd1 {[%emt 0:00:02]} Rb2 {[%emt 0:02:
44]} 48. Rg6 {[%emt 0:00:23]} Kf4 {[%emt 0:01:03]} 49. Rf6+ {[%emt 0:02:18]}
Ke3 {[%emt 0:00:47][%csl Ge3][%cal Rb2d2] [#]} 50. Re6+ {[%emt 0:00:02]} Kxf3 {
[%emt 0:00:49]} 51. Bb7 {[%emt 0:00:52]} Nf4 {[%emt 0:00:14]} 52. Re5 {[%emt 0:
00:17]} g4 {Accuracy: White = 45%, Black = 88%.} 0-1

[Event "25th Space Coast Open"]
[Site "Cocoa Beach, Florida"]
[Date "2018.04.29"]
[Round "5"]
[White "Corrales Jimenez, Fidel"]
[Black "Li, Ruifeng"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "B90"]
[WhiteElo "2498"]
[BlackElo "2585"]
[Annotator "Dyson,Peter"]
[PlyCount "63"]
[EventDate "2018.04.27"]
[EventCountry "USA"]
[TimeControl "5400+30"]
[WhiteClock "0:48:31"]
[BlackClock "0:47:55"]

{[%evp 19,63,54,47,15,15,15,41,32,34,26,50,50,50,50,58,0,0,-28,11,-87,-46,-47,
-27,-27,-24,-25,-21,-17,-23,-23,-17,-25,-23,-23,-27,-27,-25,-27,-20,-23,-27,
-27,0,0,-13,-27]} {Annotated with assistance of ChessBase Tactical Analysis
running Stockfish 7 64.} 1. e4 {[%emt 0:00:00]} c5 {[%emt 0:04:45]} 2. Nf3 {
[%emt 0:00:00]} d6 {[%emt 0:00:06]} 3. d4 {[%emt 0:00:00]} cxd4 {[%emt 0:00:05]
} 4. Nxd4 {[%emt 0:00:00]} Nf6 {[%emt 0:00:08]} 5. Nc3 {[%emt 0:00:00]} a6 {
[%emt 0:00:08]} 6. a4 {[%emt 0:00:18]} e5 {[%emt 0:01:18]} 7. Nf3 {[%emt 0:00:
05]} h6 {[%emt 0:00:17]} 8. Bc4 {[%emt 0:00:04]} Qc7 {[%emt 0:02:41] B90:
Sicilian Najdorf: Unusual White 6th moves, 6 Be3 Ng4 and 6 Be3 e5} (8... Nc6 9.
O-O Be7 10. Qe2 O-O 11. Rd1 Be6 12. Be3 Rc8 13. Ba2 Re8 14. a5 Bxa2 15. Rxa2
Bf8 16. Bb6 {1-0 (46) Fedorov,A (2559)-Indjic,A (2623) Batumi 2018}) 9. Bb3 {
[%emt 0:00:28]} Be7 {[%emt 0:00:14]} 10. O-O {[%emt 0:00:08]} O-O {[%emt 0:00:
10]} 11. h3 {[%emt 0:01:24]} Be6 {[%emt 0:01:22]} 12. Be3 {[%emt 0:00:05]} Nbd7
$146 {[%emt 0:04:01]} ({Predecessor:} 12... Bc4 13. Re1 Nbd7 14. Nd2 Be6 15. f3
Nc5 16. Nd5 Nxd5 17. Bxd5 Bxd5 18. exd5 {1/2-1/2 (39) Zavacki,I (2149)-Mihalj,
M (2298) Zupanja 2007}) 13. Nh4 {[%emt 0:04:24]} Nc5 {[%emt 0:05:04]} 14. Bxc5
{[%emt 0:01:13]} dxc5 {[%emt 0:03:05]} 15. Bxe6 {[%emt 0:00:34]} fxe6 {[%emt 0:
00:06]} 16. Qe2 {[%emt 0:01:36]} Kh7 {[%emt 0:01:06]} 17. Rad1 $11 {[%emt 0:03:
01]} ({White should play} 17. a5 $14) 17... c4 $11 {[%emt 0:01:39]} 18. g3 {
[%emt 0:08:39]} Rab8 {[%emt 0:05:18]} 19. f4 $6 {[%emt 0:01:44]} (19. Nf3 $11 {
remains equal.}) 19... exf4 {[%emt 0:07:24] [#]} (19... Qb6+ $142 20. Kh2 Qxb2
21. Rf3 Qb6 $17) 20. e5 {[%emt 0:04:38]} Bc5+ {[%emt 0:00:56]} 21. Kh1 {
[%emt 0:03:35]} Qc6+ {[%emt 0:02:16]} 22. Ng2 {[%emt 0:00:23] [#]} f3 $1 $15 {
[%emt 0:08:51][%mdl 512]} 23. Qxf3 {[%emt 0:15:28]} Nd5 {[%emt 0:01:08]} 24.
Qe4+ {[%emt 0:02:05]} Kg8 {[%emt 0:00:42]} 25. Rxf8+ {[%emt 0:07:48]} Rxf8 {
[%emt 0:00:09]} 26. Nxd5 {[%emt 0:00:04]} exd5 {[%emt 0:00:05]} 27. Qxd5+ {
[%emt 0:00:06]} Qxd5 {[%emt 0:00:07]} 28. Rxd5 {[%emt 0:00:02] KRB-KRN} Rf1+ {
[%emt 0:00:07]} 29. Kh2 {[%emt 0:00:02]} Bg1+ {[%emt 0:00:06]} 30. Kh1 {
[%emt 0:00:02]} Bd4+ {[%emt 0:00:16]} ({Black can play on with} 30... g5 31.
Rd7 b5 32. axb5 axb5 33. h4 Rb1 34. Rb7 b4 $17) 31. Kh2 {[%emt 0:00:05]} Bg1+ {
[%emt 0:03:19]} 32. Kh1 {[%emt 0:00:04] Accuracy: White = 57%, Black = 68%.}
1/2-1/2

[Event "25th Space Coast Open"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2018.04.29"]
[Round "5"]
[White "Yanovsky, Vlad"]
[Black "Leyva Rivera, Yunier"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C45"]
[WhiteElo "2112"]
[BlackElo "2429"]
[Annotator "Dyson,Peter"]
[PlyCount "78"]
[EventDate "2018.??.??"]
[TimeControl "5400+30"]
[WhiteClock "0:05:49"]
[BlackClock "0:01:38"]

{This game is a real barn burner, with first Black sacrificing an exchange on
move 16 as his King came under heavy fire. Black defended multiple mate
threats until White erred, missing some key winning lines. Then came the
counter attack, and by time White returned the exchange on move 36, Black’s
attack on the dark squares was irresistible, and the game ended a few moves
later.} 1. e4 {[%emt 0:05:08]} e5 {[%emt 0:00:32]} 2. Nf3 {[%emt 0:00:06]} Nc6
{[%emt 0:00:25]} 3. d4 {[%emt 0:00:10]} exd4 {[%emt 0:00:35]} 4. Nxd4 {[%emt 0:
00:08]} Bc5 {[%emt 0:01:06]} 5. Nb3 {[%emt 0:00:07]} Bb6 {[%emt 0:00:55]} 6.
Nc3 {[%emt 0:00:07]} d6 {[%emt 0:00:50]} 7. Qe2 {[%emt 0:00:26]} Nge7 {[%emt 0:
02:17]} 8. Be3 {[%emt 0:00:22]} O-O {[%emt 0:00:32]} 9. O-O-O {[%emt 0:01:16]}
f5 {[%emt 0:00:27]} 10. f4 {[%emt 0:00:26]} fxe4 {[%emt 0:01:23]} 11. Nxe4 {
[%emt 0:02:31]} Bg4 {[%emt 0:20:24]} 12. Qxg4 {[%emt 0:05:37]} Bxe3+ {[%emt 0:
01:09]} 13. Kb1 {[%emt 0:00:14]} Bxf4 {[%emt 0:00:02]} 14. Nbc5 $1 {[%emt 0:13:
37] Returning from its exile on b3.} Ne5 {[%emt 0:01:02]} 15. Qh3 {[%emt 0:02:
06]} Qc8 {[%emt 0:10:14]} 16. Ne6 {[%emt 0:15:44]} Rf5 $1 {[%emt 0:10:20]} 17.
g4 {[%emt 0:07:55] [#]} Qxe6 $2 {[%emt 0:05:34]} (17... Nxg4 $1 18. Nxg7 Kxg7
19. Qxg4+ Kh8 $11) 18. gxf5 $16 {[%emt 0:00:40]} Nxf5 {[%emt 0:00:32]} 19. Bg2
{[%emt 0:01:51]} Kh8 $2 {[%emt 0:07:44]} 20. Rhf1 $18 {[%emt 0:02:19]} Ng6 {
[%emt 0:02:19] [#]} 21. Qg4 $4 {[%emt 0:06:28] This lands White in some
difficulties.} (21. Ng3 $142 $1 Rf8 22. Rde1 Qc8 23. Nxf5 Qxf5 24. Qxf5 Rxf5
25. Re8+ Nf8 26. Bxb7 {and White is winning.}) 21... Qe5 $17 {[%emt 0:00:42]
Threatening ...Ne3.} 22. Ng5 {[%emt 0:02:09]} Rf8 $4 {[%emt 0:01:27] Now the
pendulum swings back in White's favor.} (22... Nh6 $8 {picks up the Knight on
g5.}) 23. Rd5 {[%emt 0:12:07]} (23. Qh5 $142 $1 Nh6 24. h4 Qe7 25. Be4 $18)
23... Nh6 {[%emt 0:01:30]} 24. Qd7 {[%emt 0:05:12]} Qe2 {[%emt 0:09:24]} 25.
Ne6 $1 {[%emt 0:01:35] A small threat of checkmate.} Rg8 {[%emt 0:02:07]} (
25... Rf7 26. Qe8+ Rf8 27. Qd7 $11) 26. Bh3 {[%emt 0:02:45]} (26. Rdd1 {
Covering the first rank would be more prudent.} Qxg2 27. Nxf4 Nxf4 28. Rxf4 $18
) 26... Be5 {[%emt 0:00:29]} 27. a3 $2 {[%emt 0:02:56] The position is
incredibly complex, and neither player finds the best moves as the advantage
swings back and forth wildly.} Ng4 {[%emt 0:03:40]} 28. Ng5 {[%emt 0:01:01]}
Nh6 {[%emt 0:00:52]} 29. Rdd1 {[%emt 0:02:27]} Qe3 {[%emt 0:03:41]} 30. Nf7+ {
[%emt 0:02:25]} Nxf7 {[%emt 0:00:05]} 31. Rxf7 $4 {[%emt 0:00:02]} (31. Rd3 $8
Qh6 32. Qxf7 $16) 31... Qb6 $1 {[%emt 0:00:52] [#] A very fine move, which
turns the tables. Attacking by retreating. Black is winning and mops up using
the dark squares.} 32. b3 {[%emt 0:00:33]} Qe3 {[%emt 0:01:27]} 33. Be6 {
[%emt 0:04:13]} Qc3 {[%emt 0:02:12]} 34. Kc1 {[%emt 0:00:00]} Nf4 {[%emt 0:04:
44]} 35. Rxf4 {[%emt 0:01:46] Desperation, but there is no defense.} Bxf4+ {
[%emt 0:00:15]} 36. Kb1 {[%emt 0:00:01]} Be5 {[%emt 0:00:19]} 37. Kc1 {[%emt 0:
00:02]} Rf8 {[%emt 0:00:53]} 38. Bf7 {[%emt 0:01:16]} Qe3+ {[%emt 0:00:35]} 39.
Kb1 {[%emt 0:00:04]} Qf3 {[%emt 0:00:05]} 0-1







Publishing Games with Game Viewer to Web Site using ChessBase 14

This is very easy!

This method will provide a game viewer, including all variations, with both a board view and the game moves.

1. Prepare the game (annotations, etc.) using ChessBase and save in a database.
2. In the database list of games, right click on the game (or highlight multiple games) and then select Output -> Publish to Web
3. In the dialog box, select "Create a HTML File"

4. Save the file
5. Open the file (if it does not open automatically). You will see the PGN for the game(s). Note: If you selected multiple games, there will be a drop down box above the board window in the final display allowing toggling between games.
6. Right click in the browser window displaying the PGN and select "View Source".
7. Select all the html code and copy it to the target page of your web site. Save and presto you are done!

UPDATE: now that I figured it out "the hard way", I see chessbase has some articles:

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3


Word to html and inserting images in html and in Word

This is a real pain! I create my article in Word, and then want to post.

The built-in word "save as" options for creating html have proven unsatisfactory.

So far, I like https://wordtohtml.net/ because the free version does a decent job of preserving formatting (bold, color fonts).

That leaves inserting photos. I have not good way to do this for images that are already in the Word file.

I tried the insert "insert/edit image" feature in using wordtohtml.net, but it encodes the entire image in the html, which will make the file huge if there are many images.

So far the best method is to finish the text portion, and use wordtohtml to create the html. Then copy/paste the html to the target location (in my case, a blogger blog page).

Once the html is ported over, I can go to the text view (which should have my font sizes and colors) and start to insert my photos using the "insert image" tool on the Blogger compose tool palette. As a first step, the photos should all be grouped together so they can all be selected. For example, they can be in a separate folder on the local computer drive, or they can have a character like "!" in front of the file name.

Then, after selected "insert image", navigate to the folder containing the images and upload all of  them (this may take a while).

Once uploaded, each can be individually inserted into the blogger article using the "insert image" tool, and selecting from among the already uploaded images (under the "from this blog" page). Once the image is uploaded, clicking on it brings up some options. Most relevant are to select the desired size (below is "large") and then "Add caption".
The caption appears here. Peter Koretsky is searching for the best move to play vs. Ruifeng Li.

--------------------
Another tip - dealing with images in Word.

If the Word version of the article is also needed. The photos will need to be inserted into the Word document, one at a time. Once the photo is where I want it, I then need to lock the anchor so the doesn't jump around within the document. To see the anchor, move the image and it should appear.

May 2, 2018

Final Standings for 25th Space Coast Open: Master Section


SwissSys Standings. 25TH SPACE COAST OPEN: MASTER/EXPERT

#
Name
Rtng
Rd 1
Rd 2
Rd 3
Rd 4
Rd 5
Tot
TBrk[M]
TBrk[S]
TBrk[C]
TBrk[O]
Prize
1
GM HEDINN STEINGRIMSSON
2630
W12
W18
D3
W6
W5
4.5
14
16.5
13.5
52.5
1720.00/Trophy
2
GM RUIFENG LI
2686
W17
W10
W9
D5
D3
4.0
13.5
16
13.5
54.5
544.67
3
GM FIDEL CORRALES JIMENEZ
2593
W27
W21
D1
W16
D2
4.0
13.5
15.5
13
51
544.67
4
IM YUNIER LEYVA RIVERA
2494
D13
W39
D16
W15
W10
4.0
11.5
13
11
40
544.67
5
GM ALEXEY DREEV
2750
W29
W14
W7
D2
L1
3.5
15
17
13
52.5

6
JOHN LUDWIG
2459
D26
W24
W31
L1
W17
3.5
11.5
13.5
10.5
40

7
ERIC COOKE
2282
W35
W28
L5
D22
W18
3.5
11
12
11
39.5
967.50/1st U2400 Trophy
8
FM CESAR VALIDO
2372
W42
L9
W26
D17
W16
3.5
10
12
10
35.5
967.50
9
DARIO TEODORI
2137
W19
W8
L2
D11
D21
3.0
13
15.5
10.5
47
903.00/1st U2200 Trophy
10
VLAD YANOVSKY
2244
W37
L2
W32
W20
L4
3.0
11.5
13
10
39

11
YAN* MIELLIER
2287
D32
W30
D15
D9
D14
3.0
11
12.5
9.5
38

12
CARLOS G ANDRETTA
2206
L1
W36
D25
D19
W24
3.0
11
12
7.5
34.5

13
RAVINDRA WIJESUNDERA
2173
D4
L22
D24
W35
W25
3.0
11
12
7
36
903.00
14
PEDRO HERNANDEZ-PEREZ
2257
W38
L5
D27
W23
D11
3.0
10.5
12
9
36.5

15
NICK MOORE
2209
W33
H---
D11
L4
W26
3.0
10.5
10.5
9
29.5

16
FM FABIO [S] LA ROTA
2280
W20
W25
D4
L3
L8
2.5
9.5
15.5
10.5
48

17
ANTHONY PARKER
2221
L2
W37
W28
D8
L6
2.5
9
14.5
8
43.5

18
SAMRUG NARAYANAN
2220
W36
L1
D23
W27
L7
2.5
7.5
13
8.5
36.5

19
IM NELSON [S] PINAL BORGES
2379
L9
D35
W30
D12
D20
2.5
7
11
6.5
32.5

20
JAMES WALKER
2000
L16
B---
W29
L10
D19
2.5
7
10
6.5
32.5
172.00
21
MARTIN HANSEN
2212
W41
L3
H---
D25
D9
2.5
6.5
10.5
7.5
31

22
ANDREW CATLIN
2015
H---
W13
H---
D7
U---
2.5
3
6.5
8
18

23
PETER [S]** DYSON
2115
H---
H---
D18
L14
X---
2.5
2.5
5.5
5
17.5
172.00
24
RAGHAV VENKAT
2133
D34
L6
D13
W39
L12
2.0
10.5
14
6
35

25
SHELEV OBEROI
2035
W43
L16
D12
D21
L13
2.0
10
13
7.5
32.5

26
THEO SLADE
2146
D6
D32
L8
W37
L15
2.0
9.5
13
6.5
37.5

27
MIGUEL RECIO
2184
L3
W41
D14
L18
D28
2.0
9
13
6
37

28
TONY BURRUS
2042
W31
L7
L17
D29
D27
2.0
9
12.5
6.5
36.5

29
JOSE [S] HERNANDEZ PADRON
2207
L5
W33
L20
D28
D30
2.0
7.5
11
5.5
33

30
PETER THEODORE BORIS
2043
H---
L11
L19
W38
D29
2.0
6
9
4.5
24.5

31
JINDRICH ZAPLETAL
2304
L28
W38
L6
W32
U---
2.0
5
8.5
6
25

32
JACKIE LIU
2047
D11
D26
L10
L31
D33
1.5
9
12
5
34.5

33
AARON LIFTIG
2003
L15
L29
L37
W36
D32
1.5
6
9
2.5
23.5

34
FM DALTON PERRINE
2293
D24
W40
U---
U---
U---
1.5
2
4
6.5
8

35
ALEXANDER HART
2035
L7
D19
D39
L13
L36
1.0
8
11.5
3.5
29

36
MELAKAH YISRAEL
2027
L18
L12
L38
L33
W35
1.0
6.5
9.5
1
25

37
GRIFFIN MCCONNELL
2028
L10
L17
W33
L26
F38
1.0
6
9
3
27

38
SULLIVAN MCCONNELL
2035
L14
L31
W36
L30
F37
1.0
5.5
8.5
3
20.5

39
GORAN MARKLOVIC
2133
H---
L4
D35
L24
U---
1.0
3
7
3.5
20.5

40
PETER [S]* DYSON
2115
H---
L34
U---
U---
U---
0.5
0
3
2
6.5

41
FM COREY ACOR
2401
L21
L27
U---
U---
U---
0.0
2
4.5
0
13.5

42
PETER [S] DYSON
2115
L8
U---
U---
U---
U---
0.0
0
3.5
0
10

43
YAN MIELLIER
2287
L25
U---
U---
U---
U---
0.0
0
2
0
7.5